Raising A Brand Part III: “Sell It!”

Here are few of the layouts for the marketing collaterals of the different reputable brands and companies that I have experienced working with.

spyder1

spyder2

spyder3

Doing ad layouts like these may look fun and easy; and I must admit… yes it is indeed! But based from my experience, doing these “effectively” is much important than having fun while working on it.  So aside from exhibiting to you some of my past artworks as additional entry to my “Artifacts” category, I’d like to give you some piece of “basic” advice in creating ad layouts like these.

Distinguish the Brand.

A lot of brands from different fields out there exist for one common goal (aside from gaining more profit, obviously!); and that is to set them apart from their competitors. Each of them has different look, feel and appeal. They may be catering for the higher or the mid-end society with different fields of interests and economic status. So, it is important to know the brand you are working for very well. You have to deliver using your artistic / visual techniques the message on how the consumer will interpret the image of the brand, as well as their vision and edge against the competitors.

spyder4

spyder5

launchpad

Identify the Target Market

After understanding the brand’s image, it works best when you get to know their target market. It is better if you emphatize and understand them first in order to get the gist of what your consumer will get. You have to be flexible in doing some advertisement layouts. Like in my case, I had clients for the different types of market like the sports enthusiasts, the teenie boppers, the geeks, and the chic, fashionista feminist-types. The economic status is also essential. For example, you cannot create a high-end looking ad layout with a European model as subject shouting out a SALE item selling a “budget-pack” local veggie in the grocery stalls. Likewise, you can’t use wiggly, playful and psychedelic pattern as background for a female model; when you work for a classy, chic, and elegant women’s clothing line.  Those were self-explanatory, but in short… fit into the target market’s shoe while you do the layouts! Remember, you always need to give them a positive shock whenever they look at your ads.

unarosa2

unarosa1

Research

Before starting on your actual laying out process, Google first! There’s tons of sample layouts out there that you may use as pegs (reference of ideas) wherein you can get ideas beforehand. I’m not saying that you copy, but it is essential to go with the flow. This is important to keep you in track of what’s trendy when it comes to advertisement of the brands with the same field. You can check your competitors and evaluate what you can do to create that edge against them. You may also wanna check the latest techniques when it comes to visual applications, for example, that HDR Photography or high definition range technique was so 2009.. whats trendy are the retro feel type of filters as  made popular by Instagram. You may also want to think out of the box but it always goes down to one common aim; create “recall”.  When you penetrate the market’s memory, the next thing you know is them finding your stores to check on your products.

mossimo

Squeeze that Creative Juice

Alright, now that you are in front of your wide screen with your good old photoshop or illustrator, remember that a good artwork always come from good mood. That creative juice will only be extracted when you are in the perfect condition to work on it. Yes deadlines may be up like a time bomb but don’t let it get in your way. You can always finish best when you have the best working mood. Stay away from bad vibes, clear your mind and focus. Be inspired; fly like Peter Pan with happy thoughts. And most specially.. enjoy! They say that in a journey, the destination doesn’t matter the most, but the journey itself. So have fun while creating the layout.

world balance

Disclaimer:

Materials used in the images are owned by the companies handling those particular brands. I don’t claim them as my own.  I blurred their logos to keep safe from whatever legal terms i might violate.

Also uploaded images are campaigns in the past years starting 2007 – early 2012, the owners have maximized the use if these images firsthand before I made use of them as part of my portfolio.

Credits:

Spyder Philippines

Unarosa

Mossimo Eyewear Philippines

World Balance Clothing

Flip Gear (a defunct brand, that’s why i need not to blur the logo as a memoir)

Launchpad Creative Marketing

Raising a Brand Part II here

Raising a Brand Part I here

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